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The High-Functioning Addict—Hiding in Plain Sight

By: Michael Plahn

The High-Functioning Addict is a term used to describe an individual who may appear to have a very productive, seemingly manageable, and in some cases an almost idyllic life…on the outside. However, it is as if he/she is living a secret dual-life. One of productivity, maybe even marked with high-achievement, while the other is a life of escape through alcohol, drugs, and/or other addictions (that the addict’s family may be oblivious). This person is able to succeed in their life well enough to where the effects of their addiction(s) has not impacted the life they project to others. This article is written about alcohol and other mind-altering drugs, but other addictions may apply.

According to an article by Kristen McGuiness: Are You a High-Functioning Addict? published on the Huffington Post website, The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) reported in a 2007 study, that claimed 19.5 percent of all alcoholics(nearly four million people) are of the “functional” subtype.

Every high-functioning addict whom I have ever met in Recovery admits to having excruciating dark times that other addicts also report. However, my experience, both personally and professionally, is that career success and wealth can delay or even prevent the initiation of the Recovery process. Career and personal successes, wealth, power and ego-inflation stemming from an impressive title or elite social circles can actually defer the emotional and spiritual pain that is typically involved with an addicted individual’s willingness to seek help. An addict’s type of career can even seemingly promote over-indulgence and make certain behavior (as long as it is not egregious) acceptable, if it is for the good of the firm.

Some high-functioning addicts have the means to take extraordinary measures to keep the pain away. This is exemplified by one Recovering addict, who asked to remain anonymous, who stated, “I knew an eight-figure guy who bought a new car every two months to get enough juice to keep the pain away; it actually worked for a while.”

Having a high-functioning person with elevated status (be it a celebrity or someone respected in a professional community) come forward about his/her struggles and subsequent Recovery is rare. Anonymity has been synonymous with most successful Recovery. Instead, we hear about the horror stories, PR nightmares, and tragedies of celebrities and professional athletes.

However, recently Chicagoans were privy to a very public admission of a struggle with addiction. A letter was posted on the WGN-TV website, written by evening news anchor Mark Suppelsa, where he admitted to having a problem with alcohol and was voluntarily entering Hazelden’s Center City, MN location for treatment. He returned a month later, as planned, and received overwhelming support from viewers, fans, colleagues, and management at WGN. The brief letter defined a very secretive high-functioning individual who was finally ready to seek help.

I am an Addiction Recovery Expert and someone who was once a high-functioning addict who understands that a high-achieving addict has tremendous responsibility. At LifeSkills Authorities, LLC. (“LSA”), I help families and self-referring individuals find appropriate help for addiction, depression, anxiety, and related issues. While it may be obvious to others and recommended by professionals to take an extended leave of absence, at LSA we look at each situation individually to find the most appropriate and realistic solution for the afflicted individual and those affected by their affliction to begin the Recovery process.

Without professional help and a well-designed and appropriate plan that is respected by the bright high-functioning person, the request to seek help usually stops abruptly. If you want a positive outcome and a plan that will help a high-functioning addict begin to recover, contact LSA now to learn about The LSA Pre-Treatment Solution and our other individualized approaches to solving our clients’ concerns.

LifeSkills Authorities, (LSA) helps individuals and families who suffer from the effects of addiction, depression, mood disorders, chronic pain and/or aging issues. LifeSkills Authorities is unmatched in its role as an objective advocate that creates a customized plan and blueprint for recovery.  This personalized solution ends the needless suffering and brings about healing and positive change for the afflicted individual, family, and loved ones.  LifeSkills Authorities is based in the Chicagoland area and serves clientele nationwide.

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The Addiction Solution

By:  Michael Plahn

This may be the most important article on alcohol or substance abuse (or addiction) you will ever read.  This may finally be the formula for solving the addiction issue in your family?  Strangely enough, the answer is straightforward and simple in theory.  However, why does it seem that many afflicted with addiction and/or mental illness, who want to recover, continue to suffer, even after professional treatment?  Are you aware that some success rates are less than 10%?  Don’t those low efficacy rates seem absurd?

If you want to solve the addiction issue in your family, once and for all, here is the formula I’d recommend:

  • Hire a qualified objective professional to be your family’s personal advocate throughout the entire process and to help you select the appropriate level of treatment to offer to your addicted loved-one
  • Have this same qualified objective professional recommend potential solutions for you and other family members such as Family Intensives (treating the entire family system is often overlooked)
  • Have the hired professional liaise with potential treatment facilities that can execute appropriate treatment programs to meet the needs of your addicted loved-one (have your advocate help you narrow the options to 2-3 qualified facilities)
  • Have a professional execute a compassionate and dignified form of Intervention/Family Meeting to present the treatment options in a loving manner
  • Contract with the same professional to accompany your addicted loved-one to the selected facility and prepare him or her for an optimal beginning to treatment (this is much more than just getting them there safely…Contact LSA to learn how we do this and why it is so essential)
  • Follow a continuum of care recommended by the professionals and needed by your afflicted family member (Primary treatment, Extended Care, Outpatient, or Customized Aftercare specific to the individual’s needs) as recommended by the treatment facility and professional advocate initially hired by the family
  • Have the family commit to Family Intensives, individual, group, and/or 12-Step help for a minimum of six-months
  • Engage with a customized multi-disciplinary program (that incorporates a 12-Step program) such as LSA’s Recovery Coaching to help your afflicted loved-one to re-acclimate to the ‘Real World’ and continue to grow, change, and stay supported throughout his or her first year of Recovery

If you, and your family take all of these suggestions, then your family and afflicted loved-one will change more than you will ever believe right now.  I’m serious!  I hear a ton of excuses as to why an individual or family cannot commit to certain actions.  And, guess what?  Those people continue to suffer.  True, it is their choice, but it does not have to be their destiny.

Sadly, but understandably, most families affected by a family member’s addiction and behavior don’t believe their loved-one will really ever embrace help and change.  However, if you follow the aforementioned actions leading up to and through the entrance into an appropriate treatment facility, you will be absolutely amazed.  If you follow all of the aforementioned recommendations, it is very possible that I will be reading an inspirational book you write about the process because of the dramatic change you and your family gratefully experience.

But, that means, no short cuts! If anyone deviates from the plan (especially the addicted family member), don’t be surprised if there is a relapse, your family goes back to status quo, falls apart, or worse.  I know this sounds rigid and dramatic, but this is a terminal disease that will also rip apart the fabric of the family.  This is one of the many reasons that qualified professional help is so essential.

I am hired to provide solutions for individuals, families, and businesses…many times for individuals who are especially defiant and difficult.   Contact LSA to allow me to stop the pattern of misery and destruction addiction has caused in your life or in the life of someone you know through The LSA Pre-Treatment Solution and LSA Recovery Coaching.

 

 

 

 

 

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Tough Love: Helpful or Hurtful?

By: Michael Plahn

‘Tough Love’ has been recommended for families affected by addiction and untreated mental illness for years.  It has been the catalyst for greatly improving the lives of people I know very well.  I have also seen this backfire and become the impetus for further misery and even tragedy.

I see this topic divide, fragment, and many times disintegrate families.  What is the best approach for you and your family?  Only you (and your family) can make those decisions.  You have to live with the decisions and the repercussions of your actions.

For sake of example, let’s use the case of Paul, a 24 year-old male who has suffered from what Mom calls Depression (but he has never been diagnosed by an appropriate professional) and abused alcohol & drugs since he was 16 years-old.  He has been to two local Outpatient Addiction Treatment programs (for alcohol, cocaine, and opiate abuse) in the past five years.  However, after completion of each program, he relapsed each time within weeks of discharge.  Paul, currently unemployed, lives with his mother, father and younger sister (Angela 17 years-old).  Paul is verbally abusive to his entire family at times, and is currently using opiates (Vicodin, Oxycontin, and heroin), cocaine, and alcohol.

Dad, loves his son, but is frustrated and wants Paul out of the house unless he is sober and holds a full-time job.  Mom is upset with her son’s behavior, but concerned for Paul’s safety if she does not help him.  She cannot bear to see her baby boy “in the streets.” Paul manipulatively threatens, “if you throw me out, I’ll likely get killed in the streets.”  Angela loves her brother, but they rarely speak anymore.  Mom and Dad have warred for years over Paul and what to do for him and with him.  First Dad was supportive, but now he is intolerant and has begun to detach from the family.  There is a constant state of tension, but silence in the home and the parents’ relationship has suffered significantly.  Mom and Dad do not interact much, but if they do it is typically a verbal battle about Paul.

What should this family do?  I know individuals who were asked (in a ‘Tough Love’ approach) to either accept help and enter a reputable treatment facility (such as PromisesCaron, or Treatment Solutions Network approved programs), or leave the family home immediately.  That was just the beginning, but many are now happy and living amazing drug-free lives for several years.  They credit their parents’ refusal to allow them to live in the family home unless they were sober (and some gainfully employed) as the key event that lead to their long-term recovery.  Some were even required to take random drug screens as a condition to stay under their parents’ roof.  These individuals would tell Mom and Dad to “Kick Paul out if he is not willing to enter an appropriate treatment facility OR immediately stop using, attend 12-Step Meetings, and have a full-time job in a week.”

But, is that really the appropriate solution for this scenario with Paul and his family?  Will it work?  It’s not that simple.  Addiction and mental illness are much more complex issues than they may appear.  Honestly, if Paul could stop on his own, he likely would have long ago (there is very little fleeting pleasure at that stage of addiction).  True, there are success stories with a rigid consequential approach, but this can also be a very dangerous approach for some individuals.  Richard Rawson, associate director of UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs claimed in a piece by ABC-News that coercive or confrontational approaches actually push the afflicted away from treatment.

Trust me, this could be an extremely complicated situation.  What works for one individual or their family may not have the same result for Paul’s family (or yours for that matter).  Let’s say that Paul was physically abused by his uncle (when Paul was 8-9 years-old).  What if he had a physical handicap during adolescence and as a result he was ridiculed and teased by his peers?  Either of these issues could change this situation significantly and may make Paul much more fragile than the family realizes.

These examples of underlying trauma are also likely to affect his ability to find long-term recovery.  If they are not addressed, it is likely that Paul will struggle and repeat dysfunctional patterns.  There is significant research that shows an extremely high percentage of addicted persons have also experienced some level of trauma  (which may be an underlying issue propelling the addiction).  At The Meadows, a facility that specializes in treating underlying causes of addiction such as trauma, they understand this reality.  Sadly, many people, minimize the significance of how trauma can negatively affect treatment outcomes and long-term recovery efforts.

If you were Paul’s Mom, I would recommend that you engage a qualified objective professional who can assist in determining an appropriate treatment facility and executing a compassionate loving process to intervene on your son. A competent professional would suggest solutions for the entire family’s treatment, not just Paul.  Granted, I’m biased, but LSA’s Pre-Treatment Solution is an ideal fit for this family’s situation.

There may be good reason to protect yourself and others in your home by asking an afflicted family member, who is acting dangerously, to leave.  But, as mentioned, this is more complicated than many well-meaning lay-people realize.  If you are going to embrace a ‘Tough Love’ stance, then please make sure you have professional guidance, that the family agrees as a group not to cave under manipulation, and become willing to accept the potential consequences of your ‘Tough Love’ approach.

 

1

Secrets, Addiction, Mental Illness, and The Private Family

By:  Michael Plahn

“This is a family problem and should be dealt with in private” –A concerned person referring to a family member who is struggling with active addiction or untreated mental illness.

This can be a sentiment that I encounter when speaking with families who are struggling with addiction and/or untreated mental illness.  Some families are more protective of their privacy than others.  For some, allowing anyone into the family’s issues, even confidential professionals, can be a challenge.  So, when addiction and mental illness reach a crisis point, without the right counsel, a family can choose to ignore the issue or take other unfortunate paths (such as confronting the afflicted member without objective professional guidance) to protect their privacy.  This is why LSA’s extremely confidential, single point of contact Pre-Treatment Solution can be so appealing to families who are concerned with privacy.

I know recovering individuals who are comfortable telling anyone and everyone about their recovery (and previous addiction).  I have watched celebrities speak about how they have personally recovered or someone in their family has successfully overcome addiction.  Recently, I watched a very grateful Carol Burnett on Piers Morgan Tonight speak about her daughter’s recovery from addiction.  I have listened to highly educated lecturers in the’ helping professions’ outline the importance of eliminating secrets within the family as a necessity to creating a healthy family system.  I know colleagues who have a strong belief that if family secrets are not eliminated, there is virtually no chance of lasting recovery (the addict will suffer or die, and the family will disintegrate).

Personally, I think that stories of recovery are needed and give the suffering some much needed hope.  I agree that secrecy (over the long-term and used as a defense mechanism) can be a huge impediment to positive change.  However, I appreciate and understand the very real need many families have, to be reassured that they are working with competent professionals who respect the confidentiality and privacy of their clients.  More directly put, these people do not want their family business ending up as public fodder.

Many times, what a concerned caller is trying to articulate is that they do not know where to begin or how many of these ‘confidential professionals’ (some of whom belong to the same social clubs and can be seen at the same community activities) may be involved in helping the family member in trouble .  What about the family that has celebrity status, a very prominent name, or a professional who does not want his or her career destroyed by ‘loose-lips.’  In cases like these, if the concerned family member(s) knew of a single point of contact who could be the family’s confidential advocate, with their best interest in mind, to navigate the entire process, they very well may seek help.  I have personally experienced very cautious and private individuals gratefully embrace LSA’s Pre-Treatment Solution as they were told how it worked.

The LSA Pre-Treatment Solution guides and assists families and businesses through the entire process of helping an afflicted family member or colleague.  It truly is a total solution…especially for the family or business concerned about privacy.  This program enables a family or business to have a single source of contact (the LSA Specialist), guide and assist the concerned family member, in a calm confident manner.

Immediately following formal engagement, the LSA Specialist follows a systematic process to help formulate a comprehensive picture and answer the questions needed to properly assist the family.  As discussed in a previous two-part LSA Blog feature, determining the appropriate level of treatment and potential facilities to execute the necessary treatment and therapies is a major undertaking (not recommended for a family member to tackle without objective professional help).  This responsibility would not fall directly on the shoulders of the concerned family member (a point where many individuals find themselves giving up), as the LSA Specialist is now their personal objective advocate who will assist and guide them to find realistic solutions to the numerous questions surrounding this topic.

This same LSA Specialist organizes and facilitates an open compassionate approach to intervening on the afflicted person and has all the logistical questions answered before the Family Meeting/Intervention takes place.  Amazingly, even the most defiant addicted/afflicted person willingly says yes and accepts help (mainly because the systematic process used was open, dignified, and offered options to the afflicted person, not coercion or demands).  The LSA Specialist moves into action again (ie., liaising with the treatment facility selected by the afflicted person and making sure they are expecting us, contacting the travel agent to let them know which flight we need booked, confirming the destination with the driver of a car already waiting outside, and then the very same LSA representative accompanying your loved-one on the entire journey).

"You Are Not Alone"

Your loved-one won’t be heading out to the treatment facility alone or asked to go with you or another family member.  LSA’s personalized accompaniment has proven to be such a significant part of our process that we insist on accompanying the afflicted person.  The trip to the treatment facility can be a frightening experience for most, as well as a time to build barriers to change and healing (usually without realizing it).  This is a key reason why LSA travels with them, from the Family Meeting/Intervention until they reach the intake room at the treatment facility.

If I am the LSA Specialist, this is one of the most profound aspects of the process for me.  It is real.  There are tears and laughter as I am bonding with them, breaking down walls, building up hope, telling them what it was like for me when I was in their position, and what they may encounter in the next few days and weeks.  This process instills hope, builds trust, and prepares them for a positive beginning to treatment.

Let’s say our destination is a Residential Treatment facility out of state, such as Promises, Casa Palmera, or Caron Renaissance.  Then, we will typically have plenty of travel time together (if the Family Meeting/Intervention is in Ohio or Minnesota).  However, even if the treatment facility selected is in-state and does not require a flight (ie., Rosecrance for someone residing in the Northern suburbs of Chicago), LSA hires a car service, allowing our focus to be on the client.  Remember, we are not just making sure your afflicted loved-one arrives, instead we are using techniques in a very casual manner to assist in making their entrance to treatment as positive an experience as possible.

The LSA representative will be present at the treatment facility’s intake meeting (with the patient’s permission) and even stays in town an additional day to check in with your loved-one the following day, to make sure things are still going well.  So, for those of you reading this who have unfortunately had a family member enter treatment multiple times, you already know how different this approach is than what you and your family have experienced.  This is truly a comprehensive solution…and the beginning of long-term recovery.

For the family who is concerned about privacy and confidentiality, I sincerely get it.  I hope you can clearly see that the LSA philosophy of helping our clients and their family members/colleagues have been filtered through this lens.  Realistically, there are still stigmas and judgment surrounding addiction and mental health issues.  And, for families that travel in certain circles, or may be in the spotlight, confidentiality and privacy is a legitimate concern.  Each family, like the individual, must find a path that works for them.  Different families will embrace recovery at different levels.  This is why it can be crucial to have a trusted adviser and personal advocate such as LifeSkills Authorities, who is adept at confidentially working with you and your family.  Don’t delay any longer, contact us now.

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How to Select an Appropriate Level of Addiction Treatment (Part 2 of 2)

By:  Michael Plahn

In Part I of this article, I wrote about 12-Step programs, individual and group counseling, and different levels of Outpatient Treatment.  The highest level of care and support is available at an in-patient ‘Residential’ program.  These programs are designed to encompass 30-90 days of primary treatment (but length of stay depends on the patient’s condition and progress as well as family resources).  There are some amazing residential treatment facilities that can help your loved one.

I am a big proponent of facilities that offer comprehensive multi-disciplinary assessments (e.g. Caron Treatment Centers) to determine the correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan.   It just makes sense, doesn’t it?  Facilities that I personally like offer an entire continuum of care, as is the case at Promises, which allows the patient to continue to progress while maintaining the continuity of the same surroundings and treatment team.  Facilities such as The Canyon and Casa Palmera treat addiction and Co-Occurring Disorders (also called ‘Dual-Diagnosis’) for individuals struggling with mental illness along with addiction.  Some residential facilities, such as The Meadows, specialize in treating addiction and trauma.  For licensed professionals, there are facilities that offer specialized tracks catering to their specific concerns and needs (available at Hazelden’s Center City location).  I have also found companies such as Treatment Solutions Network to be very helpful as they represent a variety of facilities.

Although programs may share a similar classification (IOP, PHP, or Residential) there are tremendous differences in one facility’s program versus another.  This is one of the big reasons why a knowledgeable objective professional can help with this decision (you may be comparing apples and bowling balls without realizing it).  To further complicate the situation, if you are counting on your health insurance plan to cover the treatment, think again.  It is essential to ascertain the level of coverage you have in your particular plan.  Many residential programs do not accept any insurance coverage (it can be a self-pay facility), but some do and I hate to keep making you read this, but without an objective professional, you may never find the facilities that may be appropriate for your loved-one AND accept your loved-one’s insurance.

The goal, as I see it, is simple, you want to make sure that if your loved one is going (that is a big if without a professional to facilitate an objective and compassionate Intervention) to an addiction and/or mental health treatment facility, that they get APPROPRIATE TREATMENT to meet their needs.  If not, it is very likely they are going to get discouraged, struggle, possibly drop-out of the program, and or relapse (or worse).

It can play out like this: the afflicted person who was pushed into treatment by their significant other and without professional guidance required a different or higher level of care, they were approached with this by the treatment clinicians and staff, the patient became agitated and refused to change levels of the program, let alone facilities, and leaves the program.  Another sad, but common situation is:  the afflicted person agrees to enter treatment but only if they can go to a program that they approve.  Being an over-achieving people pleaser, who is certainly not telling the staff how they feel or divulging all of the secrets they are ‘taking to their grave,’ does everything necessary to quietly and successfully complete an outpatient treatment program.  They say they plan on attending AA as a maintenance program, but are hiding bottles and pills in a matter of weeks.  Many times, in either of those cases, those same individuals are even branded with “they just weren’t ready to change or stop using,” by family or friends.

Addiction (let alone adding mental illness if present) is a progressive and potentially fatal disease that rips apart families and takes lives prematurely.  A comparison to another potentially terminal disease, Stage IV Lung Cancer, is on point.  So, if a professional recommends professional treatment, I would not suggest that you navigate the different levels and facilities on your own (no matter how adept you are at Google searches), look for a convenient program that is “In-Network” for the insurance plan, or ignore it because “your loved-one would never agree to it” (you might be surprised if you have a professional facilitate an Intervention/Family Meeting).  Get the best and most appropriate help! In my experience (clinically and experientially), to do so will likely require an objective professional.  Contact LSA to work with an objective professional who will help with every aspect of this process in the LSA Pre-Treatment Solution.

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How to Select an Appropriate Level of Addiction Treatment (Part 1 of 2)

By:  Michael Plahn

This can be a simple question to answer in some cases.  But, in others it can be a bit more complex.  One thing is certain, I do not recommend that you tackle this issue without the guidance of an objective addictions professional.  That means, I do not recommend that you seek counsel on this decision from: your family doctor, a physician friend (who is a well-known surgeon and you’ve know since high school), your Psychologist (who you have seen for ‘years’) who does not specialize in addictions and Co-Occurring Disorders, or your brother who has been in AA for twenty-five years (God Bless him).  SEEK OBJECTIVE GUIDANCE FROM AN ADDICTIONS PROFESSIONAL to help you make the decision (and not necessarily the nice person from the insurance company; remember that your insurance company is trying to keep their costs down).

This is such a large topic, that I will have to break it into two entries.  My hope is that you will get a cursory understanding of some of the primary treatment available and the jargon used to describe it.  I will write soon about Aftercare, Extended Care, Recovery Coaching, and other subsequent solutions that are extremely important to a long-term solution.

There are a variety of options that could be considered a positive action for an addicted person to take to address their addiction (and possibly related issues).  However, there are some important things to consider.  First, if your loved-one is addicted to alcohol, then they are at risk for a serious and potentially deadly side effect during detoxification (called delirium tremens) that must be monitored by medical professionals.  Similarly, if they have been taking a class of drugs called benzodiazepines, they are also at risk for seizures.  Additionally, your loved-one may have other issues (trauma, Depressive Disorders, or other mental illness) that must be taken seriously, need to be screened for or addressed, and as a result, this makes professional treatment the prudent choice.

A 12-Step program such as Alcoholics Anonymous could be a first-entry point to help the addicted person, but only after the aforementioned issues have been screened for and addressed.  AA is a non-professional spiritual solution that has saved and changed millions of lives (it is not group therapy).  12-Step programs are a crucial component of a proven path of long-term recovery (that are usually introduced during primary treatment) and will likely be recommended by professionals for your loved-one after they successfully complete a professional treatment program.

Now to tackle the different types of professional treatment.  First, there is individual or group counseling—it is a minimal amount of care (roughly one hour per week) and usually better served as a means of support and help after an individual has been to a professional treatment facility.  However, if you were seeking such a solution, I would recommend looking for a professional with a minimum of a Masters Degree (Social Work, Counseling, or Clinical Psychology) along with a certification called a CADC (Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor).

Typically, most professionals consider ‘treatment’ to begin with outpatient programs at a professional addiction treatment facility.  The lower level of this type of treatment is called an Intensive Outpatient Program or “IOP,” which typically may meet for three (3) hours (usually in the evenings) for four days a week for roughly six weeks.  The next level of care is called a Partial Hospitalization Program or “PHP”.  This is usually 6-9 hours/day Monday-Friday and a few hours on Saturday for about 25+ days (many times determined by insurance coverage and the progress of the patient).  In most cases, unless otherwise noted, there is not housing for the patients; they typically stay at home and commute to these programs.  The advantage with semi-supervised housing (available at a program like The Professionals Program at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago, IL) is in developing peer support and keeping the focus on treatment (it also allows the family a break and time to begin healing).

As this article is getting lengthy, I will stop here and continue in Part II.  In the second part of this piece, I will continue to write about the types of treatment, beginning with Residential Treatment, and what to look for in a program if your loved-one needs help.  Please remember that my succinct solution for this topic is to engage an objective addictions professional (available through LSA’s Pre-Treatment Solution) to guide you through this process as your advocate.

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Hitting Bottom: A Deadly Myth About Addiction

By: Michael Plahn

Following is a flat-out myth that I have encountered with multiple clients and prospective clients in the past few weeks; it is a commonly accepted view held by many (even some in recovery, who are unaware of proven clinical methods) about the addicted or persons suffering from certain mental illness.

“I know they (addicted person) must “hit bottom” before they can get help. I know there is really nothing anyone can do until this happens and they become willing to change.”

Yes, an addicted person is likely unable to change without help.  One of the main reasons is that addiction affects the mind and prevents some of the brightest and even high-functioning individuals from seeing the same reality as seen by an outsider.  Addiction and/or untreated mental illness can create extreme levels of denial and self-deception.  For this reason, as you may have read in my previous postings, I attempt to keep logic out of the process when helping and afflicted person.  Why?  Because when it comes to discussing his or her own addiction or illness, I am not dealing with a rational or logical person.  So, I have found keeping logic out of the process to be very effective.

LSA’s Pre-Treatment Solution includes what is essentially an Intervention.  Yet, it is actually only about 20% of the entire LSA solution.  There are many other essential components to help a person embrace help willingly, as well as help the family as a whole.  LSA’s Family Meeting/Intervention is not the entire process; it is a piece of the solution.

The reason I refer to intervening on an individual, as a Family Meeting is to dispel fear caused by some coercive “sneak-attack” versions that may have been seen on TV.  At LSA, we use a transparent model with a compassionate loving approach for facilitating our Family Meetings / Interventions. Yes, we tell the addicted or afflicted person that we are going to have a meeting on a certain date…it actually establishes respect and eliminates secrets.  And, guess what?  The process is extraordinarily effective and the addicted person tends to be present at that first meeting.

Let’s get back to this question about “hitting bottom” as it is an important myth that must be dispelled (and, truthfully, its also the title of my post).  If you wait for your loved-one’s bottom, there is a high likelihood that this person will encounter tragedy and possibly die waiting for this bottom.  Addiction is a disease with endless bottoms.   If a highly trained, objective professional coordinates a compassionate approach (without negative emotion, or logic) there is a good chance the result can be different.  With this loving and compassionate approach, along with extremely detailed planning, it is absolutely possible to “Raise the afflicted person’s bottom so they can reach out and accept help.”

So, if someone you care about is in the throws of addiction and/or untreated mental illness, you can alter their path of destruction and misery.  However, I caution you as I have written before, that I still have not met anyone who has successfully facilitated this process (without objective professional help) for someone they love.  I strongly encourage you to hire a competent professional trained in a variety of Intervention formats (I recommend a compassionate and transparent format).  Contact LSA now to learn how we can help you and someone who may be in trouble.

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Contents on LifeSkillsAuthorities.com including any images, text, external links, graphics or any other material posted on this website is intended solely for informational purposes. The information contained herein is written by non-medical professionals and not a substitute for professional medical advice, treatment or diagnosis of any disease or disability. Please seek advice from a qualified medical professional with any questions that you may have regarding your physical or mental health condition(s). If you are experiencing thoughts of suicide, or any other medical emergency, dial 911 or visit your local emergency room immediately. The thoughts and views expressed here are not necessarily those of LifeSkills Authorities, its owners, employees, or management.